Are Your Volunteers Tiggers Or Eeyores?

By Dennis Fischman :

Does your organisation use volunteers? Then you know they’re more than just do-gooders. Your volunteers are:

  • Hands doing work your staff don’t have to do
  • Eyes perceiving things you might miss
  • Voices, speaking for you and about you to their friends
  • Donors! People who give their time are more likely to give money too, and people who give money will give more if they’ve had a great volunteer experience with your organization.

But donors/volunteers differ, and you have to communicate with them in ways that fit their personalities. That’s why I’m recommending an article by Cody Lawson at Bloomerang: What Winnie the Pooh Can Teach Us About Nonprofit Donor Personas.

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Some donors/volunteers are Tiggers, bouncing from one idea or project to the next. Some are Eeyores. They feel deeply, but it takes a lot of encouragement for them to act.

Some are Piglets, who prefer to stay out of the spotlight when they help. Some are Kangas, looking out for the good of everyone else in your little corner of the forest.

My main takeaway from this article?

“Not all donors are created equal. Understanding donor personas and engaging with them in the proper way, through the proper channels, is the key to fundraising success!”

Through Communicate! Consulting, I help nonprofit organisations understand their supporters and win their loyalty, year in and year out. So if your organisation wants to get a better picture of your donors–both your constant volunteers and the people you know only as names–let’s talk. Because your volunteers and your donors are amazing characters–but you have to know how to read them like a book.

Dennis is a  Cause and Effective Associate who helps not for profits gain loyal friends through their communications. Send a note to dennis@twofisch.com to find out how.

About B-Cause

B-Cause is published by Cause and Effective. Our goal is to inspire, inform and encourage people doing good to do even better.

Thats our take on things. Over to you, please add to the discussion.

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