The Janus Factors – The bountiful opportunities arising from Executive Transition

12426657_sBy Chris Gandy

Executive transition is all about endings, changes and beginnings of various types.

Transition represents a time of disruption and hope, one of reflection and renewal. But as Tom Adams, a specialist in executive transitions in the not for profit sector insists, “if managed intentionally and proactively, transitions can serve as pivotal moments, contributing to the long term health and well-being of the organisations in question, as well as the sector as a whole.” Rather than dreading its inevitability or dwelling on the downside aspects, he encourages us to consider the surprising number of opportunities unleashed by change.

We touch on a number of these opportunities on our website but to do them justice we have decided from June to explore each in detail via a weekly blog series.

At Cause and Effective we call these opportunities Janus Factors, named after the mythical figure of  Janus  – the Roman god of gates, doorways  and bridges who symbolises the transition from one place, condition or state, to another. Linking the notion of change to the image of doorways between expectation and experience, Janus (for whom the month of January is named) is always depicted with two faces: one face anticipates the future, while the other is simultaneously reflecting on the past—recognising that good beginnings are often founded on good endings.

For us Janus is the perfect symbol for executive transition and join us from next week as we jump into the opportunities Janus presides over.

About the author: Chris Gandy MAPS is a Director of Cause and Effective (www.causeandeffective.info),  a group of professionals dedicated to assisting cause-based organisations make an even greater impact via coaching, consultation and an innovative executive transition program.

About B-Cause

B-Cause is published by Cause and Effective. Our goal is to inspire, inform and encourage people doing good to do even better.

Thats our take on things. Over to you, please add to the discussion.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s